What we like from Canada

              Dear world, Canada is not just snow and ice. People like to think we eat poutine, dress in flannel or total denim, and play ridiculous sports like curling. (Okay, we do these things too) Let me blow you mind: Canada has culture! Below are some movies, places, activities, and foods Canada likes.

 

  • Tim Horton’s If America runs on Dunkin’s, Canada runs on Timmy’s. Although this coffee and donut shop are not new nor is it culture, Tim Horton’s is and always will be something Canadian’s like. Here, you can order your daily double-double (2milk, 2 sugars in your coffee) and a box full of Timbits (the hole of the donut!!).

 

  •  Xavier Dolan 2016 was a very successful year for Canadian celebrities: Justin Bieber, Shawn Mendes, Drake, The Weeknd. One you may not have heard of goes by the name of Xavier Dolan. As

a young actor-director from Quebec, Dolan has had many cinematic successes, including the critically acclaimed film I Killed My Mother. Most recently, Dolan premiered his film It’s only the End of the World starring Lea Seydoux, Marion Cotillard, and Vincent Cassel at Cannes. Without a doubt, Dolan is one Canadian filmmaker to watch.

 

 

 

  •  Smoke’s Poutine A popular chain in Canada (and has locations across America too!!!!!!), Smoke’s Poutine serves Canada’s infamous delicacy: French fries sprinkled with cheese curds and doused in gravy. However, I would like to remind everyone that Iceland’s national dish is Hakarl, or preserved shark meat. So, don’t make fun of Canada’s greatest invention. It’s fatty, salty, cheesy, and rich: basically, your survival starter pack to Canadian winters. Seriously, when it is -30*C outside, you begin to understand why Canadians eat poutine and are proud of it.

 

  • Book: All the Light We Cannot See Although this story is written by an American, All the Light We Cannot See has had great success across the globe. In Canada, the Globe and Mail ranks this story, published in 2014, as one of the 2017 bestsellers. It talks about the parallel stories between a small blind girl from Paris and a German boy who joins the Nazi party in the second world war. It deservingly won a Pulitzer Prize.

– by Luise S